becausebirds:

the difference between birds and birbs

(Source: ForGIFs.com)

todaysdocument:

The Fall of Atlanta:
The city of Atlanta, Georgia fell to Union forces under Major General William T. Sherman on September 2, 1864, following a six week siege after the Battle of Atlanta on July 22, 1864.

Photos from the series: Selected Views from “Photographic Views of Sherman’s Campaign” by George N. Barnard, Photographer, 1862 - 1865

The impact of the fall of Atlanta was instrumental in the eventual victory for the Federal forces. It boosted morale in the North and insured the reelection of President Abraham Lincoln which meant that the war would continue to the South’s capitulation. Until then, with no major Confederate Army left to contest Sherman and his men, he would order them to move east, towards Savannah, and from there, north into the Carolinas. Unopposed, Sherman’s Army brought the war to the heart of the South and to its civilian population.
These photos are from a series by George Barnard. Once an employee of Matthew Brady Studios, Barnard worked for the Topographical Branch of the Army Engineers after December 1863. Assigned to Sherman’s Army, he captured many of the images of the Atlanta Campaign on early photographic equipment.
via The Atlanta Campaign of 1864: The Camera at War

(Be sure to follow atlantahistorycenter's series of Civil War Letters for more!) todaysdocument:

The Fall of Atlanta:
The city of Atlanta, Georgia fell to Union forces under Major General William T. Sherman on September 2, 1864, following a six week siege after the Battle of Atlanta on July 22, 1864.

Photos from the series: Selected Views from “Photographic Views of Sherman’s Campaign” by George N. Barnard, Photographer, 1862 - 1865

The impact of the fall of Atlanta was instrumental in the eventual victory for the Federal forces. It boosted morale in the North and insured the reelection of President Abraham Lincoln which meant that the war would continue to the South’s capitulation. Until then, with no major Confederate Army left to contest Sherman and his men, he would order them to move east, towards Savannah, and from there, north into the Carolinas. Unopposed, Sherman’s Army brought the war to the heart of the South and to its civilian population.
These photos are from a series by George Barnard. Once an employee of Matthew Brady Studios, Barnard worked for the Topographical Branch of the Army Engineers after December 1863. Assigned to Sherman’s Army, he captured many of the images of the Atlanta Campaign on early photographic equipment.
via The Atlanta Campaign of 1864: The Camera at War

(Be sure to follow atlantahistorycenter's series of Civil War Letters for more!) todaysdocument:

The Fall of Atlanta:
The city of Atlanta, Georgia fell to Union forces under Major General William T. Sherman on September 2, 1864, following a six week siege after the Battle of Atlanta on July 22, 1864.

Photos from the series: Selected Views from “Photographic Views of Sherman’s Campaign” by George N. Barnard, Photographer, 1862 - 1865

The impact of the fall of Atlanta was instrumental in the eventual victory for the Federal forces. It boosted morale in the North and insured the reelection of President Abraham Lincoln which meant that the war would continue to the South’s capitulation. Until then, with no major Confederate Army left to contest Sherman and his men, he would order them to move east, towards Savannah, and from there, north into the Carolinas. Unopposed, Sherman’s Army brought the war to the heart of the South and to its civilian population.
These photos are from a series by George Barnard. Once an employee of Matthew Brady Studios, Barnard worked for the Topographical Branch of the Army Engineers after December 1863. Assigned to Sherman’s Army, he captured many of the images of the Atlanta Campaign on early photographic equipment.
via The Atlanta Campaign of 1864: The Camera at War

(Be sure to follow atlantahistorycenter's series of Civil War Letters for more!) todaysdocument:

The Fall of Atlanta:
The city of Atlanta, Georgia fell to Union forces under Major General William T. Sherman on September 2, 1864, following a six week siege after the Battle of Atlanta on July 22, 1864.

Photos from the series: Selected Views from “Photographic Views of Sherman’s Campaign” by George N. Barnard, Photographer, 1862 - 1865

The impact of the fall of Atlanta was instrumental in the eventual victory for the Federal forces. It boosted morale in the North and insured the reelection of President Abraham Lincoln which meant that the war would continue to the South’s capitulation. Until then, with no major Confederate Army left to contest Sherman and his men, he would order them to move east, towards Savannah, and from there, north into the Carolinas. Unopposed, Sherman’s Army brought the war to the heart of the South and to its civilian population.
These photos are from a series by George Barnard. Once an employee of Matthew Brady Studios, Barnard worked for the Topographical Branch of the Army Engineers after December 1863. Assigned to Sherman’s Army, he captured many of the images of the Atlanta Campaign on early photographic equipment.
via The Atlanta Campaign of 1864: The Camera at War

(Be sure to follow atlantahistorycenter's series of Civil War Letters for more!)

todaysdocument:

The Fall of Atlanta:

The city of Atlanta, Georgia fell to Union forces under Major General William T. Sherman on September 2, 1864, following a six week siege after the Battle of Atlanta on July 22, 1864.

Photos from the series: Selected Views from “Photographic Views of Sherman’s Campaign” by George N. Barnard, Photographer, 1862 - 1865

The impact of the fall of Atlanta was instrumental in the eventual victory for the Federal forces. It boosted morale in the North and insured the reelection of President Abraham Lincoln which meant that the war would continue to the South’s capitulation. Until then, with no major Confederate Army left to contest Sherman and his men, he would order them to move east, towards Savannah, and from there, north into the Carolinas. Unopposed, Sherman’s Army brought the war to the heart of the South and to its civilian population.

These photos are from a series by George Barnard. Once an employee of Matthew Brady Studios, Barnard worked for the Topographical Branch of the Army Engineers after December 1863. Assigned to Sherman’s Army, he captured many of the images of the Atlanta Campaign on early photographic equipment.

via The Atlanta Campaign of 1864: The Camera at War

(Be sure to follow atlantahistorycenter's series of Civil War Letters for more!)

amymebberson:

Coffee-Zilla

My piece for A Little Known Shop’s Iron Giant tribute show - Sep 13 in Anaheim!

ourpresidents:

LBJ Signs the Nurse Training Act — This Week in 1964

For all they do for us, the LBJ Library is offering free admission throughout September for nurses and nursing students, in honor of the anniversary of the 1964 Nurse Training Act, signed on Sept. 4, 1964. 

Photo # A4357-7, 06/24/1967. First Grandchild of President & Mrs. Lyndon B. Johnson, Partick Lyndon Nugent, born June 21, 1967.

-from the LBJ Library


"Gregory Peck! Where is he!?"

"Gregory Peck! Where is he!?"

(Source: desiarnaz)

todaysdocument:

ourpresidents:

The “March on Washington” Leaders Visit the White House
On this day in 1963, civil rights leaders speak to members of the press following a meeting with President John F. Kennedy regarding “The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom” that was held earlier that day. 
Photos:
Left to right: President of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA (NCC), Reverend Eugene Carson Blake; unidentified (back to camera); President of the National Urban League, Whitney M. Young, Jr.; President of the Negro American Labor Council (NALC), A. Philip Randolph; unidentified man (in back); Executive Secretary of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Roy Wilkins (speaking at microphones); President of United Auto Workers (UAW), Walter P. Reuther; President of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.; President of the American Jewish Congress, Rabbi Joachim Prinz; several unidentified reporters. White House, Washington, D.C. 8/28/63.
President John F. Kennedy and Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson meet with organizers of “The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom” in the Oval Office. 8/28/63.
"1963: The Struggle for Civil Rights" from the JFK Library

Don’t miss our series from last year’s 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington → todaysdocument:

ourpresidents:

The “March on Washington” Leaders Visit the White House
On this day in 1963, civil rights leaders speak to members of the press following a meeting with President John F. Kennedy regarding “The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom” that was held earlier that day. 
Photos:
Left to right: President of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA (NCC), Reverend Eugene Carson Blake; unidentified (back to camera); President of the National Urban League, Whitney M. Young, Jr.; President of the Negro American Labor Council (NALC), A. Philip Randolph; unidentified man (in back); Executive Secretary of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Roy Wilkins (speaking at microphones); President of United Auto Workers (UAW), Walter P. Reuther; President of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.; President of the American Jewish Congress, Rabbi Joachim Prinz; several unidentified reporters. White House, Washington, D.C. 8/28/63.
President John F. Kennedy and Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson meet with organizers of “The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom” in the Oval Office. 8/28/63.
"1963: The Struggle for Civil Rights" from the JFK Library

Don’t miss our series from last year’s 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington →

todaysdocument:

ourpresidents:

The “March on Washington” Leaders Visit the White House

On this day in 1963, civil rights leaders speak to members of the press following a meeting with President John F. Kennedy regarding “The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom” that was held earlier that day.

Photos:

Left to right: President of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA (NCC), Reverend Eugene Carson Blake; unidentified (back to camera); President of the National Urban League, Whitney M. Young, Jr.; President of the Negro American Labor Council (NALC), A. Philip Randolph; unidentified man (in back); Executive Secretary of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Roy Wilkins (speaking at microphones); President of United Auto Workers (UAW), Walter P. Reuther; President of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.; President of the American Jewish Congress, Rabbi Joachim Prinz; several unidentified reporters. White House, Washington, D.C. 8/28/63.

President John F. Kennedy and Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson meet with organizers of “The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom” in the Oval Office. 8/28/63.

"1963: The Struggle for Civil Rights" from the JFK Library

Don’t miss our series from last year’s 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington →